Exploding Golf Balls, Ferris Wheels and Carousels…How Close to Stand to the Ball?…Barney Beard Golf

The simple answer

Stand as close to the ball as possible and still manage to hit it.

Here are some things I’ve learned:

  1. Most everyone stands too far from the golf ball.
  2. If you stand too far from the golf ball, you’ll be leaning over, reaching for the ball.
  3. If you stand too far from the golf ball, your head will be down on your chest like a droopy cantaloupe.
  4. If you stand too far from the golf ball, your spine will be curved in an ugly arc like a crescent moon about to fall out of the sky.
  5. If you stand too far from the golf ball, you’ll often top it.
  6. If you stand too far from the golf ball, you’ll tend to swing around your body and hit the ball into someone’s back yard or in the middle of the lake.
  7. If you stand too far from the golf ball, you’ll tend to be the worst golfer in your group and be a sucker for all the latest fads in golf equipment.

Let me explain:

Yep, everyone stands too far from the golf ball. When you stand too far from the golf ball you’ll have to adjust by bending your head and neck over and down more than you should.  You’ll bend over and have to reach for the ball. When you bend the upper part of your spine over too much, your cantaloupe will be drooping down onto your chest, your spine will be bent almost double and you’ll feel more like a hockey goalie in full pads with a broken hockey stick rather than a cool-as-a-cucumber golfer ready to make a free and easy swing.

If the golfer’s spine is arched over towards the golf ball with a droopy cantaloupe, the droopy cantaloupe will interfere with the shoulder turn during the swing. When a droopy cantaloupe gets in the way of the golfer’s shoulder turn, the golfer will sometimes top the ball and other times hit the ground six inches behind the ball.

Standing too far from the ball at address promotes a droopy cantaloupe, permanent curvature of the spine, hockey breath and is the main reason some golfers quit the game in frustration.

The golf swing should be more Ferris wheel than carousel. The golf swing should be up and down—not around. The golfer takes the club back away from the ball and up into the air and then back down and through the ball and then back up into the air after impact—not around in a circle like a horizontal helicopter blade. The golfer must stand close to the ball to be a Ferris wheel.

The golfer doesn’t take the club behind their back and around to hit the golf ball. The golf swing should be up and down like a Ferris wheel, not around like a carousel at the amusement park.

Folks that come to me for lessons always want to stand too far from the golf ball. I don’t know why. I think perhaps it’s because they are unsure of their ability to turn their body as they strike the golf ball. Perhaps they feel like they have more control when they stand too far away from the ball. Perhaps instead of looking at the golf ball they want to smell it. Perhaps they have a mysterious fear of contracting a dread disease if they stand too close. Maybe they’re afraid the golf ball will explode when they hit it.

Ok, what are the positives? How should the golfer stand at address?

Try this on the practice range. Stand as close to the ball as you can and still manage to hit it. Address the ball with your head and neck as high as you can get them and still see the ball. Stand as close to the ball as you can and still manage to strike the golf ball. You do realize that with your head, neck and upper body in this up-position you can’t be wearing reading glasses, bifocals or progressives and still see the golf ball? You know that, don’t you?

Go to the range and experiment with this. Take your eight iron and put the ball up on a short tee to make it easy. Crowd the ball and see how close you can stand and still hit it. If you stand close, it will force you to raise you head and straighten your spine. Standing close to the ball will force your trunk and hips to turn out the way of the impact position. You’ll discover when you stand closer you’ll have to push your watermelon BACK out of the way of your hands coming in front of your belt buckle and through the impact zone. Remember: Ferris wheel–not carousel.

Standing closer will force the golfer to get their head up above the shoulder turn.

Proper golf posture, starting from the bottom is, bent knees, flexed hips, straight spine and head up above the shoulders.  In this posture the straight spine will be tilted towards the golf ball allowing the arms to hang almost straight down from the shoulder joints.

Standing closer will help you hit the ball straighter, it will reduce your taxes, help bald men grow hair and give your complexion a more youthful look.

Of course, I suppose most people would stand closer if they weren’t afraid of exploding golf balls.

Play Often, Have Fun, Respect the Game,

Barney Beard

ps. Click Here to order my book: Golf for Beginners: How Not to be Embarrassed on the First Tee. My Momma would be proud of me. My book, Golf for Beginners won the silver medal in the FAPA literary competition and the bronze medal in the elit competition.

pps. Click Here to order my book: Golf for Beginners: Left Hand Version.

ppps. I also have a blog about stories and letters for my grandchildren. Click Here.

Copyright 2019 Barney Beard Golf. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the author.

Well, I’ve finally done it. My historical novel about the Cherokee deportation, A White Killing Frost, is on the shelf ready for you to check out in the Lady Lake Library and the Sumter County Library in Wildwood. It’s also available in almost every public library system in both Georgia and Florida. How good is that? Also, you can buy it directly from me off my tailgate for a discount price and you won’t have to pay shipping. I suppose I am a late bloomer, as my mom suggested long ago. How good is that? The book is also available on Amazon both digitally and hard copy. The digital book is only $2.99.Click Here. I have a new book just published, The Bow Window.  Click Here.

 

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The Ejection Seat…Pre-Shot Routine…It’s Critical In Your Setup…Barney Beard Golf

The Pre-Shot Routine

A pre-shot routine is critical for golfer’s who want consistency in their ball striking.

Years ago a young friend of mine told me this story about an incident that occurred during his time in the United States Navy working as an ejection seat technician on the Navy’s now outdated Grumman A-6 airplane. To let you know how old the A-6 is, and how old I am to have a friend who worked on the A-6, it was designed to replace the old Douglas A-1 piston-driven Skyraider.  The A-6 went into service in 1963. That’s an old airplane, isn’t it?

The A-6 Intruder saw service until 1997.  It’s an interesting aircraft. The pilot and the navigator/bombardier sat side by side. My friend told me the A-6, nicknamed ‘Double-Ugly’,  had a glide ratio of something between a cast-iron, claw-foot bathtub and a grand piano.  If you’re interested in this old aircraft you can go to this website. CLICK HERE.

Well, my young sailor friend and his unit were out in the Gulf of Mexico on an old aircraft carrier. The A-6 pilots were practicing take-offs and landings. There can’t be much in life as unnerving for a human being than to ask a young man or young woman to land a two-hundred mile-an-hour airplane on a moving surface not much larger than a tennis court. I do exaggerate, but not much.

Here’s the point of my story. One day a pilot was sitting on the flight deck of their little aircraft carrier in his A-6 side by side with his navigator-bombardier getting ready for a takeoff. The pilot had completed his pre-flight checklist and was ready to give the go ahead for the catapult.

At the proper moment, the pilot would give his two engines full throttle and the powerful catapult would sling the aircraft off the end of the small practice carrier like a little boy with a rubber band shooting paper-wads in class.

Just as the pilot was about to give the order to launch, power was lost on the catapult. Oh no. The pilot sat in the aircraft waiting for the restoration of power. As you might guess, it was impossible to launch the A-6, or most any jet aircraft, without the aid of a catapult.

After only a couple of minutes the pilot got word the catapult was again powered up and his launch was a go.

The sailor in the carrier’s tower asked the pilot if he wanted to go through the preflight checklist once again. Since the pilot had just completed his check list and since the power had been down on the catapult for only the briefest of time, the pilot declined. He told the tower it was un-necessary to go through the annoying check list a second time.

The pilot called for launch and powered his engines to full throttle and the catapult was released . The G-forces on the men in the airplane under full throttle with the additional energy of the catapult would pin the pilot and his bombardier/navigator back in their seats as the A-6 screamed down the deck destined for the wild blue yonder.

There was one problem, however. The pilot had re-applied his brakes when the power went down on the catapult. The aircraft’s brakes were necessary to prevent the airplane from inadvertently rolling on the unstable flight deck to an unwanted position because of wave action.

Normally, pilots release their brakes before takeoff. There’s a good reason for that. It’s not easy to launch an airplane from a carrier deck with the brakes on, even with a catapult.

The A-6 started forward.  With the immense forward thrust of the two screaming jet engines and the powerful catapult, the rubber tires, locked by the aircraft’s brakes, instantly exploded with a huge bang.

Since the explosion of the high-pressure pneumatic tires occurred precisely at the same time, the sound of the explosion was loud enough to convince the pilot that one or both of his engines had failed. The pilot was certain that his now underpowered airplane would be thrown off the end of the flight deck and he, his bombardier/navigator and the airplane would sink to the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico in humiliation.

The A-6 went off the nose of the carrier and instantly disappeared below the level of the flight deck exactly as the pilot had feared. The airplane, deprived of proper take-off speed, predictably dropped towards the sea out of the view of all the sailors topside. Oh no! Oh no!

As if from out of the sea, two ejection seats appeared heading upwards powered by their underside rockets. The pilot and his navigator/bombardier sailed high into the air. When they reached their apex and began to fall, their parachutes deployed and the two airmen landed softly in the sea beside the aircraft carrier.

The resilient A-6, though deprived of a great deal of speed by the tires that failed to roll, surprisingly had enough power to continue flying even after the crew had ejected. As the pilots landed in the warm water of the Gulf of Mexico, the airplane continued climbing for a few minutes and then, without a pilot at the controls, the entire topside crew of the carrier watched the pilotless plane roll over and dive into the sea.

The pilot should have used his checklist, shouldn’t he?

Guess what? If you don’t want to crash and burn, or sink to the bottom of the watery depths of the lakes, ponds and rivers on your local golf course, you’ll develop a set-in-concrete pre-shot routine you will use each and every time you strike a golf ball.

Professional golfers ALL use a pre-shot routine. Why? Because their livelihood depends on their performance.

Even if you are an amateur weekend golfer, a simple pre-shot routine can save you from an ignominious mistake on the golf course in front of your friends that might cost you dearly when you settle up in the clubhouse.

Everyone’s pre-shot routine is different depending on the golfer’s experience and ability.

After the golfer has determind what kind of shot to hit with which club, a beginner’s preshot routine might be something like:

  1. Grip
  2. Address the ball
  3. take my stance
  4. assume correct posture, watermelon back, arms straight, cantaloupe up.
  5. A little tension releasing waggle
  6. Hit the ball!

No two experienced golfers would have the same pre-shot routine. No two professionals would have the same pre-shot routine, but they ALL have one.

Everyone will develop their own pre-shot routine on the practice range. My advice is develop your pre-shot routine to the point that you’re able to reproduce it EVERY TIME you swing at the golf ball on the golf course.

Of course, you can ignore this advice like the pilot did. If you do, I suggest you get a supply of those floating golf balls.

Play Often, Have Fun, Respect the Game

Barney Beard

 

ps. Click Here to order my book: Golf for Beginners: How Not to be Embarrassed on the First Tee. My Momma would be proud of me. My book, Golf for Beginners won the silver medal in the FAPA literary competition and the bronze in the elit competition.

pps. Click Here to order my book: Golf for Beginners: Left Hand Version.

I often have spare copies of various golf instructional books in good condition by well known authors available for sale if you come by the range. I keep a supply in my truck, $5.00 a copy.

ppps. I also have a blog about stories and letters for my grandchildren. Click Here.

Copyright 2019 Barney Beard Golf. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the author.

Well, I’ve finally done it. My historical novel about the Cherokee deportation, A White Killing Frost, is on the shelf ready for you to check out in the Lady Lake Library and the Sumter County Library in Wildwood. It’s also available in almost every public library system in both Georgia and Florida. How good is that? Also, you can buy it directly from me off my tailgate for a discount price and you won’t have to pay shipping. I suppose I am a late bloomer, as my mom suggested long ago. How good is that? The book is also available on Amazon both digitally and hard copy. The digital book is only $2.99.Click Here. I have a new book just published, The Bow Window.  Click Here.

 

 

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The Golf Grip…Consistent Grip Pressure…Barney Beard Golf

Never re-grip your golf club.

You should maintain a consistent grip-pressure when using your driver, a fairway wood, a hybrid or short iron into the green, a wedge , chipping or pitching from close in or your putter. The successful ball striker MUST hold every golf club on every swing with a firm grip throughout.

The successful ball striker must maintain a consistent grip-pressure going back, at the top and coming down into the ball. If you had a grip-pressure meter to help you with your swing, you would work to have the same strong, firm grip-pressure at every point.

How you grip the golf club is the number one fundamental in golf. How you grip the golf club throughout your golf swing is critical. The point of this lesson is to remind you:

Never Regrip the Golf Club During Your Swing

Over the years I’ve noticed many of my golf students re-gripping the golf club during their golf swing. This is a common fault among beginners and veterans alike. Re-gripping the golf club during the swing will cause a plethora of problems like ulcers, loss of copious amounts of cash and the raising of the golfer’s handicap and the lowering of the re-gripper’s self esteem. There have even been cases of rickets, warts and ingrown toenails caused by re-gripping the golf club during the swing.

This re-gripping of the golf club usually, but not always, occurs at the top of the backswing. The transition is the point at the top of the backswing where the golfer stops going backwards and begins the downswing. It’s at this critical moment, the transition, I see the most problems by ‘re-grippers’.

Ok, what’s the cure and preventative?

  1. Go to the practice range.
  2. Begin with a full, smooth 8 iron.
  3. Connect your brain with your hand and fingers during your swing.
  4. Monitor your grip pressure.
  5. As you hit practice balls, concentrate on maintaining a firm, strong grip pressure even when the ball is on the way to the target. Better a bit too strong a grip than too weak. Think a 7 or 8 out of ten grip pressure. When you swing, there can be no possibility of repositioning one’s hands on the handle of the golf club.

Here’s another hint. Add grip pressure to your pre-shot routine. When you take the club out of the bag for a shot, grip the club BEFORE you address the ball. Grip the club in the exact manner you’re going to hit the ball.

There should be ‘NO RE-GRIPPING’ during your set up. Re-gripping during your set up will lead to re-gripping during your swing.

Grip the club firmly during your entire swing. I wouldn’t want you have ulcers or ingrown toenails.

Play Often, Have Fun, Respect the Game

Barney Beard

ps. Click Here to order my book: Golf for Beginners: How Not to be Embarrassed on the First Tee. My Momma would be proud of me. My book, Golf for Beginners won the silver medal in the FAPA literary competition and the bronze in the elit competition.

pps. Click Here to order my book: Golf for Beginners: Left Hand Version.

I often have spare copies of different golf instructional books in good condition by well known authors available for sale if you come by the range. I keep a small supply in my truck. I’ll sell them for $5.00 a copy.

ppps. I also have a blog about stories and letters for my grandchildren. Click Here.

Copyright 2019 Barney Beard Golf. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the author.

Well, I’ve finally done it. My historical novel about the Cherokee deportation, A White Killing Frost, is on the shelf ready for you to check out in the Lady Lake Library and the Sumter County Library in Wildwood. It’s also available in almost every public library system in both Georgia and Florida. How good is that? Also, you can buy it directly from me off my tailgate for a discount price and you won’t have to pay shipping. I suppose I am a late bloomer, as my mom suggested long ago. How good is that? The book is also available on Amazon both digitally and hard copy. The digital book is only $2.99.Click Here. I have a new book just published, The Bow Window.  Click Here.

 

 

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Analyze Your Golf Game to Lower Your Scores…Smart Practice…Barney Beard Golf

How to Analyze Your Golf Game for Lower Scores

Ok, you’ve been playing golf for a few years. You love the 18 hole big girl and big boy golf courses. You love playing golf with your friends but you’re tired of being their doormat. It’s depressing to be the worst player in your group. You’re ready to improve your game. You want to break 100 with consistency.

I have good news. You can do it! Not only do I have good news, but I have a plan!

  1. Review my book, Golf for Beginners.
  2. Regularly practice your short game.
  3. Analyze your game. Identify weaknesses. Improve the weakest parts first.

Ok, how do you analyze your game? That’s easy. I’ll divide the golf game into fourteen parts. After you play a round, you can sit down with paper, pencil and your scorecard before you and determine which of those fourteen parts of your game need the most work.

Here’s how to divide your game inorder to identify strengths and weaknesses. Which are your strengths? Which areas are weak?

  1. Short putts – three feet or less.
  2. Twenty foot putts.
  3. Lag putting – putts thirty, forty and fifty feet.
  4. Putting from just off the green.
  5. Putting from well off the green – up to 50 yards.
  6. Chipping close to the green.
  7. Pitching close to the green.
  8. Chipping farther from the green – up to 50 yards.
  9. Pitching farther from the green – up to 50 to 70 yards.
  10. Short Irons-100 yards in.
  11. Approach Irons 100-150 yards.
  12. Hybrids and long irons.
  13. Fairway woods.
  14. Driver.

So, here’s what you can do. After each round, take this list and place it beside your scorecard on the table in front of you. Think about each hole you played.  Determine where you lost strokes to par on each hole. Match lost strokes to par against the above list.  If you lost a stroke to par on a given hole, put a tick mark beside one of the fourteen areas on your list. Then, after you’ve examined your entire scorecard, identify which areas of the fourteen parts of your golf game are the weakest, which area/s has the most tick marks. Which of the fourteen areas cost you the most strokes?

For Example: Let’s say you sit down with your scorecard and determine you lost the most strokes to par in your short game. You discovered in your examination if you were to improve three areas,  your chipping close to the green, pitching close to the green and lag putting, you could reduce your score substantially. With this new found information you go to the practice green and practice the kind of shots you misplayed during your round. That’s it.

Maybe the next time you play you’ll discover your short putts were the weakest part of your game. Maybe one time you’ll discover your driver cost you the most shots to par.

Maybe one time after you play you realize if you could hit your short irons a little better you could take pressure off your chipping and pitching and lower your score. Analyze your game and be smart when you practice.

Have a definite plan for your practice. Determine the weak parts of your game and work on them. Yard by yard, practice is too hard. Inch by inch, practice is a cinch. The best bricklayers in the world lay one brick at a time.

What you don’t want to do is:

What you don’t want to do is go to the driving range every week and practice your driver and fairway woods. You may receive great pleasure and release from  stress by expending vast amounts of energy by swinging your driver and three wood as hard as you can, but I can assure you, that isn’t where you need to work in order to lower your average score.

Work on your short game and work on your scoring clubs, the short irons into the green.

Of course, considering the person who is writing this article, it might be in your best interest to take a golf lesson or two after you have identified the weakest part/s of your game. Since this is our busy season here in Florida you might want to sign up for my six or ten lesson package and work on your game here in the Sunshine State.

In any case, practice when you can and you’ll see the results, but remember:

Bad practice makes you badder. Good practice makes you gooder.

Play Often, Have Fun, Respect the Game,

Barney Beard

ps. Click Here to order my book: Golf for Beginners: How Not to be Embarrassed on the First Tee. My Momma would be proud of me. My book, Golf for Beginners won the silver medal in the FAPA literary competition and the bronze in the elit competition.

pps. Click Here to order my book: Golf for Beginners: Left Hand Version.

I often have spare copies of different golf instructional books available if you come by the range. I keep a small supply in my truck. I’ll sell them for $5.00 a copy.

ppps. I also have a blog about stories and letters for my grandchildren. Click Here.

Copyright 2019 Barney Beard Golf. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the author.

Well, I’ve finally done it. My historical novel about the Cherokee deportation, A White Killing Frost, is on the shelf ready for you to check out in the Lady Lake Library. It’s also available in almost every public library system in both Georgia and Florida. How good is that? Also, you can buy it directly from me off my tailgate for a discount price and you won’t have to pay shipping. I suppose I am a late bloomer, as my mom suggested long ago. How good is that? The book is also available on Amazon both digitally and hard copy. The digital book is only $2.99.Click Here. I have a new book just published, The Bow Window.  Click Here.

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Short Game…Best Way to Practice…Barney Beard Golf

Best Way to Practice Your Short Game

My Daddy and I played a lot of golf when I was a boy. Daddy loved the game. I did too. Soon after we began playing, Daddy made friends with the local pro, Nathan Smith. After Nathan and Daddy began to hang out together, we really began to work on our game. Golf became our only hobby. We cleared some land out back and fenced it in. We put a couple of steers and a few goats in the pasture so we wouldn’t have to mow our driving range. The steers ate the grass and the goats ate everything else. We now had our own ultra low maintenence practice facility. You can go to my website and see some old photos of those days. Click Here to see those photographs from last century.

After we built our driving range, we built two golf greens on the south side of the house, one a double level green. We bought a greens’ mower. Nathan gave us a hole cutter, cups, old flagsticks and we had our own practice facility just outside our back door. I wish you could have been there.

We practiced often. Over the years I learned some things about the short game I want to share with you.

  1. Golf is a game. Have fun.
  2. Make your golfing practice a game. Practicing golf should never be work. Work is what you do so you’ll have the money and the time to PLAY golf.
  3. Your short game practice should imitate real golf and be FUN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It’s ok to hit a bucket of balls on the practice range. However, hitting one ball after another can teach the golfer bad things. How is that? If you hit a terrible ball on the practice range, you can quickly hit another ball and in your mind you can erase the bad shot. That’s not the case on the golf course, is it? On the golf course you can’t throw down another ball after a bad shot. On the golf course you have to count every stroke if you’re honest. Golf pencils don’t have erasers.

Let’s say you want to practice your chipping. Here’s my advice:

  1. Hit twenty or so chips one after another to work on your stance, grip, balance and swing. No more than that to warm up. Now you’re ready for REAL practice.
  2. Over time develop a chipping pre-shot routine. Over time you want to be consistent. You’ll want to do the same thing the same way every time you chip. If you don’t know how to do that you’ll need to see your golf professional, won’t you? You can’t get on the wrong bus and get to the right place.
  3. Ok. You’ve hit twenty practice chips in a row. Now you’ve warmed up. Your chipping muscles are flexed.  Your golfing mind is concentrating. You’re ready for some serious practice.
  4. Take three things to the practice green. Take one ball, take the club you use to chip and take your putter.
  5. Practice chipping and putting exactly as you would if you were on the golf course. Practice for an hour or two. (smile). That’s what Daddy and I did. We would take one ball, our 7 iron and our putter and compete with one another around our practice greens for hours.
  6. Here’s how to practice your short game. Drop one ball just off the green and chip to a hole.
  7. After you chip, lay down your chipping club. Now take your putter and walk over to the hole and make the putt. Take the same amount of time and go through the same routine you would use if you were putting in an important match on your favorite golf course. You don’t want to actually practice being sloppy, do you?
  8. If you have difficulty making the putt, learn to chip the ball closer.
  9. In this little practice game you’ll use only one ball and always putt that one ball after you chip.
  10. Chip with one ball and then putt…Chip with one ball and then putt…Chip with one ball and then putt. Do that for an hour.
  11. When you chip with one ball and then putt, you’re practicing golf–real golf.
  12. It may seem like a waste of time to chip and then pick up your putter and walk over and putt the ball into the hole. The time you spend walking back and forth isn’t a waste. It’s time well spent. It’s fun. You’ll be thinking all the time you’re walking over to putt the ball. You’ll be thinking how you can improve your chipping. You’ll be thinking how you can get the ball closer to the hole. You’ll learn how to make your short putts with greater consistency. If you practice your short game this way you’ll improve quickly. If you take a bag of balls and chip them all over the practice green without putting each one, you may get worse instead of better.
  13. If you really want to improve your short game, find a friend and go to the practice green. Both of you use one ball and putt after each chip. Make a game out of your practice. Compete with one another.
  14. I normally don’t think it a good idea to make wagers in life. Gambling isn’t a good thing. I never go to a casino where the casino owners tell you plainly that the odds are in their favor. I had rather give my money to a good charity. Golf is different, isn’t it? When my good friend Joe and I were teaching at the same golf course, we used to practice our short game together almost every day. We would take three or four clubs and one ball and practice shots from fifty yards in. We would play for a dollar a hole. I can remember us playing for hours and I would rarely win or lose more than two dollars. Those were the days when my short game was at its best. You can imagine why.

If ninety percent of your short game practice is with one ball, it won’t be long till your mind will figure out that you only have ONE CHANCE to get your ball close to the hole. If you practice with one ball you will get used to the idea that you don’t have a whole bucket of balls to waste. Things will happen inside your head, good things, marvelous things, subconscious things, wonderful thoughts that will tighten up your game.

Practice your short game with one ball and putt each ball after your chip to the green. Daddy would be proud of you!

Play Often, Have Fun, Respect the Game,

Barney Beard

ps. Click Here to order my book: Golf for Beginners: How Not to be Embarrassed on the First Tee. My Momma would be proud of me. My book, Golf for Beginners won the silver medal in the FAPA literary competition and the bronze in the elit competition.

pps. Click Here to order my book: Golf for Beginners: Left Hand Version.

ppps. I also have blog about stories and letters for my grandchildren. Click Here.

Copyright 2019 Barney Beard Golf. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the author.

Well, I’ve finally done it. My historical novel about the Cherokee deportation, A White Killing Frost, is on the shelf ready for you to check out in the Lady Lake Library. It’s also available in almost every public library system in both Georgia and Florida. How good is that? I suppose I am a late bloomer, as my mom suggested long ago. How good is that? The book is also available on Amazon both digitally and hard copy. The digital book is only $2.99.Click Here. I have a new book just published, The Bow Window.  Click Here.

 

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Barney Beard at the Sumter County Library Monday at 2:00 pm…Author’s Presentation on The White Killing Frost by: Barney Beard

Work on your short game!

I played golf with my buddies this past week for the first time since my hip replacements. I did very well considering. My short game needs some work to get back to where I was several years ago.

If you want to lower your score, spend a lot of time working on your short game. I like the short game practice area at Bonifay in the Villages.

 

Here’s a literary note:  Tomorrow I’ve giving an author’s presentation at the Sumter County Library at 2:00 pm. Everyone is invited and of course there is no charge. I’ll be talking about my historical novel, A White Killing Frost, and answering questions.

See you there,

Barney Beard

 

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Teaching Golf To Children…Augusta, Georgia…The Masters…Barney Beard Golf

Teaching Golf to Children

A couple of months ago a grandmother brought me a young man to see if I could help him learn to hit a golf ball. The young man, Brantley, was entered and competed in the local preliminary Drive, Chip and Putt competition. The final competition is held each year during Master’s week in the spring at the Masters golf tournament in Augusta, Georgia.  Brantley is seven years of age.

Well, Brantley came and I gave him a few lessons. He went to the competition a couple of weeks ago. There were about thirty children in the seven to nine age group. Brantley was the youngest competitor. He was the only seven year old. Brantley was first in the chipping competition and finished fifth over all.  He was not selected to go on to the next level. He was mildly disappointed but it was excellent experience for the young man. He and I are already working on next year. I fully expect him to do very well in his next competition.

It occurred to me that you might be interested in what I was trying to teach Brantley. Ok, here are some of the important things we work on each time he comes for a lesson. Do they sound familiar?

  1. Grip. If Brantley is to achieve his potential as a golfer he must learn to hold the golf club correctly. The grip is the number one fundamental of golf. If the golfer holds the club correctly it forces the muscles of the body to swing correctly. If the golfer has an incorrect grip on the handle of the golf club, it will prevent the golfer from swinging correctly. I believe if I were to teach any beginning golfer how to hold the club correctly, that person could learn to play golf quite well without further instruction.
  2. Ball Position. Ball position is critical. If the golf ball is not played in the proper position in relation to one’s feet, it makes striking the golf ball and sending it where it should go quite a trick.
  3. Quiet Feet.  The golfer must have a stable table at impact. The golfer’s strength, leverage and stability come from the ground, not out of the air. The bottom of the golfer’s shoes are most important. The golfer can’t slip, slide, dance, hop, move, gyrate, lift or scoot the feet until AFTER impact. The finish position of the golfer must not precede impact. The golfer must not prematurely reach the lovely finish position golfers see in photographs. At the moment of impact the bottom of the golfer’s shoes should be firmly attached to the soil. No exceptions. Moving to that lovely balanced position with the belt buckle facing the target and the right foot up on it’s big toe, are both accomplished AFTER impact.
  4. Release. Release through impact is kinda like trying to hit a line drive over third base in baseball. Release is the right hand powering through impact and at the same time, that same right hand turning over the top of the left. This is difficult to impossible to accomplish if the golfer has a poor grip. A proper grip is the first fundamental.
  5. Correct form for Chipping. You can’t get on the wrong bus and get to the right place. There is no way to become proficient at chipping unless the golfer uses the correct form. Brantley is right-handed. Here are some important points in chipping. Use the 7 iron. Grip down until the forefinger of the right hand is touching the shaft, that is, make the club short. Play the golf ball directly in front of the right big toe. Stand extremely close to the ball. Feet close together, almost touching. Slightly open left foot and left side. Hands slightly ahead of the ball. Weight on left heel. There is no weight shift towards the right foot in chipping.

Well, this is it for now. Brantley will progress and grow during the next year. He loves the game and can’t wait until the next time his grandfather takes him to play. Oh my, I wish I had begun to play when I was seven and my grandmother took me to the professional. Oh well.

I predict Brantley will go far, if not all the way, in next year’s competition. Won’t it be grand to go to Augusta and watch the young fellow compete? And then, if I live long enough, I’ll get to see him compete in the Master’s tournament itself. Brantley promised he would see that I got tickets when he is invited to compete in that tournament. I’m sure he’ll keep his promise. Brantley is like that.

Here’s a note. I never charge to teach children. All lessons for children are complimentary. I do love the game of golf and want to give back at least a little.

Play Often, Have Fun, Respect the Game,

Barney Beard

 

ps. Click Here to order my book: Golf For Beginners: How Not to be Embarrassed on the First Tee.

pps. Click Here to order my book: Golf for Beginners: Left Hand Version.

ppps. I also have blog about stories and letters for my grandchildren. Click Here.

Copyright 2019 Barney Beard Golf. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the author.

Well, I’ve finally done it. My historical novel about the Cherokee deportation, A White Killing Frost, is on the shelf ready for you to check out in the Lady Lake Library. It’s also available in almost every public library system in both Georgia and Florida. How good is that? I suppose I am a late bloomer, as my mom suggested long ago. How good is that? The book is also available on Amazon both digitally and hard copy. The digital book is only $3.00.Click Here. I have a new book just published, The Bow Window.  Click Here.

 

 

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